TULSA

Citywide Education Progress Report

Key Takeaways: Student and School Outcomes

Graduation rates in Tulsa showed little change relative to the state, remaining 9 percentage points below state averages in 2014-15. Math and reading proficiency rates also did not improve relative to the state. Most student sub-groups are not proportionately enrolled in advanced coursework in high school: Black and Hispanic students are underenrolled while white students are overenrolled.
STEPPING UP  >  CITIES  >  TULSA  >  OUTCOMES  |  REFORMS

Is the education system continuously improving?

► In 2014-15, the city’s graduation rate was behind the state’s.

Data: Percent of first-time 9th grade students graduating in four years, citywide and statewide.
Source: EDFacts Initiative, U.S. Department of Education, Assessment and Adjusted Cohort Graduation Rates Data, 2012-13 to 2014-15.


► Between 2014-15 and 2016-17, the city’s math performance trends mirrored the state’s. In 2016-17, the city’s proficiency rate was 16 percentage points below the state’s.

Data: This figure reflects the city’s estimated gains in proficiency rates across elementary and middle schools, standardized at the state level and controlling for student demographics.
Source: Oklahoma State Department of Education, 2014-15 to 2016-17.


► Between 2014-15 and 2016-17, the city’s reading performance trends mirrored the state’s. In 2016-17, the city’s proficiency rate was 15 percentage points below the state’s.

Data: This figure reflects the city’s estimated gains in proficiency rates across elementary and middle schools, standardized at the state level and controlling for student demographics.
Source: Oklahoma State Department of Education, 2014-15 to 2016-17.


Do students have access to a high-quality education?

► In 2013-14, white students were enrolling in high school advanced math coursework at rates above their enrollment, while black and Hispanic students had disproportionately low enrollment.

Data: Enrollment of students in math courses above Algebra II. Rates calculated by dividing the number of students enrolled in advanced math by the number of students in the school. Sub-group rates determined at the school level.
Source: U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights, Civil Rights Data Collection 2013-2014.


Data & Scoring

Where did we get this data?

► Publicly available state and federal data, making our results comparable and reproducible.

► The most up-to-date data available for all 18 cities at the time of our data collection. See Methodology & Resources for more information.

What makes the data citywide?

► We include all charter and district schools within the municipal boundary of a city.

► In Houston, Indianapolis, Memphis, New Orleans, and San Antonio we use school data from multiple districts within the municipal boundary.

Background

About Tulsa

The primary district in Tulsa, Tulsa Public Schools (TPS), has been pursuing a number of systemic changes to improve school and student performance. The district adopted a strategic plan in 2016 and is currently focusing on teacher leadership, school innovation, and personalized instruction. TPS also aims to increase school-site autonomy and partner with nonprofit groups to operate some school campuses. 

School Choice in the City

Tulsa is home to 12 charter schools. TPS operates magnet schools that have neighborhood preference and selective admission policies. Families can also opt in to any district neighborhood school on a space-availability basis using an administrative transfer process.

Governance Model

The Tulsa Public Schools Board oversees district schools, and TPS authorizes half of the city’s charter schools. The other charter schools are authorized by Langston University or Rose State College. TPS also contracts for partnership schools.

2016 District Student Body

Enrollment: 38,628 students
Race and ethnicity: 33% Hispanic, 25% white, 25% black, 17% other
Low income: 73% free and reduced-price lunch

2017 School Composition 

Note: Enrollment and demographics data for Tulsa district schools only.
Source: Tulsa Public Schools, 2016.
School data from researcher analysis of public records, 2016-17.

The Center on Reinventing Public Education is a research and policy analysis center at the University of Washington Bothell developing systemwide solutions for K–12 public education. Questions? Email crpe@uw.edu.