CAMDEN

Citywide Education Progress Report

Key Takeaways: Student and School Outcomes

School proficiency rates in reading improved across the city, relative to the state. Graduation rates also improved, and student sub-groups enrolled in high school advanced math coursework at similar rates as the high school population. However, both proficiency and graduation rates remain far below state averages.

STEPPING UP  >  CITIES  >  CAMDEN  >  OUTCOMES  |  REFORMS

Is the education system continuously improving?

► The city’s graduation rate has been increasing,
although in 2014-15 it still lagged behind the state’s.

Data: Percent of first-time 9th grade students graduating in four years, citywide and statewide.
Source: EDFacts Initiative, U.S. Department of Education, Assessment and Adjusted Cohort Graduation Rates Data, 2011-12 to 2014-15.


► Between 2011-12 and 2014-15, the city’s math trends in proficiency rates mirrored the state’s performance trends. In 2014-15, the city’s proficiency rate was 20 percentage points below the state’s.

Data: The city’s estimated gains in proficiency rates across elementary and middle schools, standardized at the state level and controlling for student demographics.
Source: New Jersey performance data, 2011-12 to 2014-15.


► Between 2011-12 and 2014-15, the proficiency gap between the city and state was closing in reading. In 2014-15, the city’s proficiency rate was 25 percentage points below the state’s.

Data: The city’s estimated gains in proficiency rates across elementary and middle schools, standardized at the state level and controlling for student demographics.
Source: New Jersey performance data, 2011-12 to 2014-15.


Do students have access to a high-quality education?

► In 2013-14, black students enrolled in advanced math coursework at rates above their enrollment, while Hispanic students had disproportionately low enrollment.

Data: Enrollment of students in math courses above Algebra II. Rates calculated by dividing the number of students enrolled in advanced math by the number of students in the school. Sub-group rates determined at the school level.
Source: U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights, Civil Rights Data Collection 2013-2014.

► In 2014-15, 12% of students in Camden enrolled in the city’s top-scoring schools. All students enrolled in top-scoring schools at similar rates as in medium- and low-scoring schools.

Data: This figure shows whether students are equitably enrolled in the city’s top 20% performing schools, based on student proficiency in state reading assessments. Within a single student sub-group, we identify what percent is enrolled in top-, middle-, and low-performing schools. If the share of students enrolled in top-scoring schools citywide and the share of a particular sub-group are similar, this means that the sub-group is equally distributed across low-, middle-, and top-scoring schools.
Source:New Jersey Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, 2011-12 to 2014-15.

Data & Scoring

Where did we get this data?

► Publicly available state and federal data, making our results comparable and reproducible.

► The most up-to-date data available for all 18 cities at the time of our data collection. See Methodology & Resources for more information.

What makes the data citywide?

► We include all charter and district schools within the municipal boundary of a city.

► In Houston, Indianapolis, Memphis, New Orleans, and San Antonio we use school data from multiple districts within the municipal boundary.

Background

About Camden

In 2012, Camden schools had some of the worst student outcomes in New Jersey: not one school among the city’s 26 was meeting state standards. In 2013, the New Jersey Department of Education took over the district. Camden launched a unified enrollment and information system, Camden Enrollment, to provide families with better information and access to school options. To improve school quality, low-performing district schools joined in partnership with high-quality charter operators who manage these “Renaissance” schools as neighborhood district schools.

School Choice in the City

All of the city’s schools are available for choice, although students are guaranteed a seat at their neighborhood school. By law, Renaissance schools must give preference to neighborhood students.

Governance Model

The New Jersey Department of Education manages the city’s district schools and authorizes all charter schools.

2015 District and Charter Student Body

Enrollment: 14,975 students
Race and ethnicity: 54% Hispanic, 44% black, 1% white, 1% other
Low-income: 89% free and reduced-price lunch

2017 School Composition 

Source: Enrollment data from the New Jersey Department of Education, 2014-15.
School data from researcher analysis of public records, 2016-17.

The Center on Reinventing Public Education is a research and policy analysis center at the University of Washington Bothell developing systemwide solutions for K–12 public education. Questions? Email crpe@uw.edu.